alternative-heating-info.com
Alternative-Heating-Info.com
Alternative Heating Home
Wood Pellet and Corn Stoves
Small Space Heaters
Alternative Cooling
Corn Furnaces and  Boilers
Fireplace Inserts
Fuel Comparison Chart
Geothermal
Grain and Multi Fuel Stoves
High Efficiency Boilers
Landscaping
Masonry Heaters
Hydropower
Outdoor Corn Boilers
Outdoor Wood Boilers
Portable Generators
Radiant Heating
Solar Energy for Homes
Solar Heating Systems
Winterize Your Home
Wind Power
Wood Stoves and Firewood
How To Buy Fuel Corn
To find suppliers of shelled fuel corn, contact the feed and seed stores in your area as
well as any feed mills and grain elevators.

The Extension Office in your county or the land-grant university in your state may also
be able to identify suppliers of corn fuel. If you know any farmers, contact them
directly to inquire if they or other farmers they know will sell shelled corn to you on a
direct basis.

Be sure that the moisture content of the corn you buy for fuel is no higher than 15%
for good combustion characteristics and for safe storage of the corn.

It will usually be cheaper to buy fuel corn directly from a farmer than from a feed mill or
elevator. Probably the most expensive place to buy shelled corn is from a fireplace
shop or even the local big box home improvement store. Buying fuel corn from an
online seller can be equally expensive.

Since corn as fuel is sold by the bushel, bag or plastic container, the easiest way to
compare fuel corn prices is by the pound.

For example, the best price I've found online for bulk purchases of fuel corn is $8.50
per 45 pound bag, or 19 cents a pound.

Compare that to corn bought from the farm or feed mill currently selling for around
$5.75 per 56 pound bushel, or 10 cents a pound.

To put this in context, buying corn for 16 cents a pound is the same as paying $4.00 a
gallon for heating oil.

In many cases, it will be necessary to purchase a large amount of corn at a time to get
the cheapest price for the corn. You may find it is necessary to purchase 25 bushels
(1,400 pounds) to 100 bushels (5,600 pounds) to negotiate the cheapest price.

Whenever discussing price, be sure to consider the cost for the delivery of the corn to
your home.